2020 Asian American Pacific Islander Leadership Summit

2020 Asian American Pacific Islander Leadership Summit

October 29, 2020
12:00 p.m. — 3:45 p.m. EST

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Sponsored By

To be determined

 

 

 

Symposium Panelists

To be determined

Moderator

To be determined

Panel Topics

Straddling Two Worlds

Being an immigrant or a child of immigrants can impose a different mindset and lifestyle that doesn’t appear to the norm. This session will analyze some of the challenges that immigrants face such as how to navigate between two (or more) different worlds and how one’s cultural background can be a barrier hindering them from career advancement. By learning more about the immigrant’s perspective, conference attendees can develop a better understanding of not only how to have an inclusive mindset, but also how to collaborate with those with different cultural backgrounds.

Stereotypes and Discrimination of Asian Americans

This session identifies common stereotypes of Asian Americans. These underlying stereotypes can lead to unconscious bias in the workplace and discrimination in society as a whole. Let’s discuss ways to break stereotypes for “The Model Minority” through awareness and education.

Asian Americans Are the Least Likely Group in the U.S. to Be Promoted to Management (according to the Harvard Business Review)

Data shows that Asian Americans are the least likely group to be promoted from individual contributor roles to management positions. Since Asian Americans are not considered an underrepresented minority, they are given little priority or attention in diversity programs. When discussing the glass ceiling, Asians are the forgotten minority and this creates a blind spot. Asian men are lumped into a “non-underrepresented” category with white men and Asian women are assigned to a category that includes women of all races. This topic will address how Asian-related programs can go from being geared toward cultural inclusion to management diversity.

How Asian Americans Can Become Allies for other minority groups

In a 2012 article by the Pew Research Center, Asian Americans were surveyed to be “the highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States. They are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country”. Now, fast forward to 2020, where the country is rising up against police brutality along with racial inequity, Asian Americans must take a personal stake in the future direction of this country. It is time to stop being a bystander and stand in solidarity with other minority groups. Come learn how to get started.

Event Agenda

12:00 — 1:30 p.m. Opening Keynote
1:00 — 1:15 p.m. Break
1:15 — 2:15 p.m. Concurrent Session

  • Straddling Two Worlds
  • Stereotypes and Discrimination of Asian Americans
  • Asian Americans Are the Least Likely Group in the U.S. to Be Promoted to Management (according to the Harvard Business Review)
2:15 — 2:30 p.m. Break
2:30 — 3:30 p.m. General Panel Session (3 People)

  • How Asian Americans Can Become Allies for other minority groups
3:30 — 3:45 p.m. Closing Remarks & Sponsors

Event Agenda

12:00 — 1:30 p.m. Opening Keynote
1:00 — 1:15 p.m. Break
1:15 — 2:15 p.m. Concurrent Session

  • Straddling Two Worlds
  • Stereotypes and Discrimination of Asian Americans
  • Asian Americans Are the Least Likely Group in the U.S. to Be Promoted to Management (according to the Harvard Business Review)
2:15 — 2:30 p.m. Break
2:30 — 3:30 p.m. General Panel Session (3 People)

  • How Asian Americans Can Become Allies for other minority groups
3:30 — 3:45 p.m. Closing Remarks & Sponsors

Panel Topics

Straddling Two Worlds

Being an immigrant or a child of immigrants can impose a different mindset and lifestyle that doesn’t appear to the norm. This session will analyze some of the challenges that immigrants face such as how to navigate between two (or more) different worlds and how one’s cultural background can be a barrier hindering them from career advancement. By learning more about the immigrant’s perspective, conference attendees can develop a better understanding of not only how to have an inclusive mindset, but also how to collaborate with those with different cultural backgrounds.

Stereotypes and Discrimination of Asian Americans

This session identifies common stereotypes of Asian Americans. These underlying stereotypes can lead to unconscious bias in the workplace and discrimination in society as a whole. Let’s discuss ways to break stereotypes for “The Model Minority” through awareness and education.

Asian Americans Are the Least Likely Group in the U.S. to Be Promoted to Management (according to the Harvard Business Review)

Data shows that Asian Americans are the least likely group to be promoted from individual contributor roles to management positions. Since Asian Americans are not considered an underrepresented minority, they are given little priority or attention in diversity programs. When discussing the glass ceiling, Asians are the forgotten minority and this creates a blind spot. Asian men are lumped into a “non-underrepresented” category with white men and Asian women are assigned to a category that includes women of all races. This topic will address how Asian-related programs can go from being geared toward cultural inclusion to management diversity.

How Asian Americans Can Become Allies for other minority groups

In a 2012 article by the Pew Research Center, Asian Americans were surveyed to be “the highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States. They are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country”. Now, fast forward to 2020, where the country is rising up against police brutality along with racial inequity, Asian Americans must take a personal stake in the future direction of this country. It is time to stop being a bystander and stand in solidarity with other minority groups. Come learn how to get started.

Don’t miss your chance to attend, register today!

Individual Registration - $49
For questions or comments please contact Alexis Abuhadba, at [email protected]g.